contemporary fiction

To Be Continued by Prex J.D.V. Ybasco

25838466Title: To Be Continued

Author: Prex J.D.V. Ybasco

Genre: Contemporary Fiction, Young Adult

Rating: 1 out 5 stars

Summary:

Not all stories end happily nor tragically. Most of them just need to be continued.Azalea Anthony is a writer, or what she claims to be.Vim Harvey is her friend, or at least what she wants to believe.Jasmine Morrish is Azalea’s archenemy, or so what Jash believes Azalea makes people believe…er–There are other characters, too: like Warren, the basketball player, Beatrix, the model, Tom, the perfect excuse of a brother, Eclaire, the eccentric bff, etc.They all hangout in one place where they can enjoy a steaming cup of debates, an aroma of gossips, a side dish of basketball, a topping of drama, and a menu of articles : The Big Coffee Shop.

I’ve been reading this book on and off for almost a year now–it’s probably time to throw in the towel.

I got to 52% before giving in–I was hoping this was going to be something different from all the contemporary YA I usually try to read because the blurb was interesting.

There’s just too much I couldn’t stand.

The characters – There’s a representative for every cliche in the universe–they just have more unique names than your normal YA characters. To be honest, a story full of characters with odd names that live in a world full of generic city names made me lol.

Azalea (or Euiea, as she wants to be called–don’t ask me why because it’s never explained!), the heroine, annoys me the most. She’s smarter than everyone else and looks down on everyone, even her friends. How she even has friends with her attitude, idek. She’s a fucking ~special snowflake and I honestly just wanted to punch her in the nose most of the time.

Poorly written characters representing every cliche in the book and no development whatsoever? No, thank you.

The plot – I struggled through half before it dawned on me–it’s just a typical love story where the girl goes through a traumatic breakup, then proceeds to secretly fall in love with her best friend. Wow, after building up Azalea as the perfect girl, she goes and does the most cliche things ever. Er. Okay.

Maybe there’s more to the story. Except I don’t want to continue reading this book anymore. If nothing interesting has happened by at least half of the book, why should I bother?

The writing – The writing and structure was just way too awkward for me to want to continue reading. I had no clue what was happening most of the time because I couldn’t understand what was going on. This book, imo, needs a ton of editing–or a lot of rewriting, really–because it was, quite frankly, awful. Grammar mistakes, incorrect use of idioms, and…just odd writing in general.

The girls are on their way home. Azalea likes savoring the afternoon air while looking at the gold patches scattered in the western horizon. She reveres Apollo’s curtain call and wants everything to be quiet. The atmosphere usually gives her lots of ideas and queer thoughts. Right now, she is thinking of why the streets of their subdivision are named after Kings and what better names they could have instead.

This description is actually some of the better writing in the book but I’ll never understand why the sun has to be referred to as Apollo. Sure, he’s the god of light and the sun, but this reference just comes out as plain awkward.

I’d recommend reading a different book instead. Y’know, so many books, so little time. So spend your time wisely on better books!

A copy was provided by the author in exchange for an honest review.

The Truth About Forever by Sarah Dessen

51737Title: The Truth About Forever

Author: Sarah Dessen

Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary Fiction, Romance

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

Summary:

A long, hot summer…

That’s what Macy has to look forward to while her boyfriend, Jason, is away at Brain Camp. Days will be spent at a boring job in the library, evenings will be filled with vocabulary drills for the SATs, and spare time will be passed with her mother, the two of them sharing a silent grief at the traumatic loss of Macy’s father.

But sometimes, unexpected things can happen—things such as the catering job at Wish, with its fun-loving, chaotic crew. Or her sister’s project of renovating the neglected beach house, awakening long-buried memories. Things such as meeting Wes, a boy with a past, a taste for Truth-telling, and an amazing artistic talent, the kind of boy who could turn any girl’s world upside down. As Macy ventures out of her shell, she begins to question her sheltered life.

Is it really always better to be safe than sorry?

The truth about forever?

Source
Translation: There’s no such thing as forever.

Memes and kidding aside, I actually liked a YA book??? One about teens falling in love???

The end of the world is nigh.

Just kidding. Again.

But it’s no secret that I am not a fan of teenage romance novels. Most YA novels that center around romance usually annoy me because of insta-love or the stupidity of the characters. Sure, they’re teens, but that doesn’t mean teenagers fucking become unbearably stupid when they fall in love.

(I mean, come on. I was a teenager. Once. I did stupid things, but I would never dream of doing some of the shit that goes on in YA romance novels.)

Ahem.

Anyway, The Truth About Forever, when summarized, sounds like your typical romance novel. Macy loses her dad and struggles with her grief and guilt while trying to be the perfect daughter so she doesn’t worry her mom, who also struggles with her own grief. They never talk about her dad, her mom gets rid of all the stuff that reminds them of him (harsh, I know), and they are very adamant about looking Toward the Future. (While never looking back at the past.)

Macy gets a job on a whim at Wish, which has chaotic, fun-loving catering crew. This crew includes Wes, a gorgeous boy with a mysterious past and well, you know where it goes from there.

Sounds typical, right? Like you’ve read this in a billion other novels before, right? I thought so too, but..surprisingly, it works.

It’s a fun, easy read about how people deal with their grief. That probably sounds contradictory, but it really was. It’s fun, but it deals with a deep issue in a great way. Everyone’s lost someone, somehow–a family member, a friend, a pet–and we all deal with it differently. Sometimes, we move on. And sometimes, we don’t. Or can’t. Sometimes, we need help from other people.

That’s what I liked about this book. I liked seeing how Macy developed from being this girl who played safe and stayed in her comfort zone because that was what worked…to someone who learned to open up and enjoy life a little. And, little by little, learn to handle her guilt and sadness over her dad passing away.

I liked the romance too, it was kinda cute, and I enjoyed all those Truth games Macy and Wes had, but it wasn’t overpowering. It didn’t make the book all sappy. *spoiler* Every suh-woon moment had me laughing and yes, suh-wooing a little, too! Haha. *spoiler*

I think what made this book work for me was how likable all the characters were. The crew at Wish, especially Delia and Kristy, were so fun and silly and lovable that they kept me amused all throughout the story.

There were some stuff I didn’t like in this book, but they were few and far between, especially considering all the things that I enjoyed.